Categorie archief: TED JAMs

Onze selectie van inspirerende TEDTalks of TEDxTalks

Know that you don’t know yourself

Or at least not as well as you think you do…

Dat is de conclusie van een interessante TED-talk over de illusie van keuzevrijheid die ik zojuist zag. We zijn echt flink te manipuleren. Marcel. Of om positief te formuleren: we hebben flexibele geesten ūüôā

Cognitief psycholoog Petter Johansson vraagt zich in zijn TED-talk af waarom we de keuzes maken die we maken? Met behulp van kaarttrucjes die hij van goochelaars heeft geleerd toont hij aan dat we onszelf toch niet zo goed kennen als we denken.

Food for thought op de zondagavond.


TED inspiratie voor Zuyd -voor in mijn buitenboordbrein-

Ha Marcel,

Zoals je weet heb ik vanaf 2012 (na de¬†Kennis in Bedrijf 2012 doorlopende voorstelling met favoriete TEDTalks¬†van medewerkers en studenten van Zuyd) in de¬†Nieuwsflits die ik wekelijks binnen Zuyd verspreid een TEDtalk gedeeld, als inspiratie voor onze collega’s. Op de website van het I-team (nu Dienst Onderwijs & Onderzoek) hield ik een overzicht bij van¬†de ruim 150 TEDtalks die ik tot maart 2017 heb gedeeld. De website¬†wordt binnenkort in een nieuw jasje gestoken en dan is er voor dit overzicht geen ruimte meer. Ik wil het overzicht graag bewaren. Daarom geef ik het een plekje in mijn buitenboordbrein.

De wekelijkse rubriek is gestopt.¬†Ontbreekt er echter volgens jou/jullie nog een mooie TEDtalk in dit lijstje, deel het alsjeblieft onder dit blog. Ik wil altijd ge√Įnspireerd, verrast, geraakt of verwonderd worden. Op ons blog (zie de rubriek TED JAMs) en zo nu en dan in de Nieuwflits deel ik nog wel eens een TEDtalk


De nummering achter de TEDtalks verwijzen naar editie van de Nieuwsflits. Via de overzichtspagina met nieuwsflitsen zijn de omschrijving van de TEDtalks te bekijken.

Tom Wujec: Build a tower, build a team¬†(205) –¬†Kevin Kelly:¬†How AI¬†can bring on a second Industrial Revolution¬†(204) –¬†Greg Gage: How to control someone els’s arm with your brain¬†(203) –¬†Helene Polatajko:¬†Mastering a new a skill in a matter of hours¬†(202) –¬†¬†Pam Warhurst:¬†How we can eat our landscapes.(201) –¬†Charlie Todd: The shared experience of absurdity¬†(200) –¬†Rajiv Maheswara:¬†The math behind basketball’s wildest moves¬†(199) –¬†Tristan Harris:¬†How better tech could protect us from distraction¬†(198) –¬†Angela Lee Duckworth:¬†Grit: The power of passion and perseverance¬†(197) – ¬†Zeynep Tufekci:¬†Machine intelligence makes human morals more important¬†(196) –¬†Johann Hari:¬†Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong¬†(195) –¬†Sanne Blauw:¬†Putting numbers back where they belong¬†(193) –¬†Jonathan Haidt:¬†The moral roots of liberals and conservatives¬†(192) –¬†Arnaud Collery:¬†Real and Raw¬†(191) –¬†Jim Hemerling:¬†5 Ways to lead in an era of constant change¬†(190) –¬†Michael Bodekaer:¬†This virtual lab will revolutionize science class¬†(189) –¬†Michael Norton:¬†How to buy happines¬†(188) –¬†James Veitch: This is what happens when you reply to spam email¬†(187) –¬†Alejandro Aravena:¬†My architectural philosophy? Bring the community into the process¬†(186) –¬†Don Tapscott:¬†How the blockchain is changing money and business¬†(185) –¬†Julia Galef:¬†Why you think you’re right – even if you’re wrong¬†(184) –¬†Terry Moore: How to tie your shoes¬†(183) –¬†¬†Brian Little:¬†Who are you, really. The puzzle of personality¬†(181) –¬†David Brooks:¬†Should you live for your r√©sum√© … or your eulogy?¬†(180) –¬†Starr Sackstein:¬†A recovering perfectionist’s journey to give up grades¬†(179) –¬†Lidia Yuknavitch:¬†The beauty of being a misfit¬†(178) –¬†Yuval Noah Harari:¬†What explains the rise of humans?¬†(177) –¬†Joshua Prager:¬†In search of the man who broke my neck¬†(176) –¬†Ji-Hae Park:¬†The violin, and my dark night of the soul¬†(175) –¬†¬†Kenneth Shinozuka:¬†My simple invention designed to keep my grandfather safe¬†(174) –¬†Dan Pallota:¬†The dream we haven’t dared to dream¬†(173) –¬†Amy Cuddy:Your body language shapes who you are¬†(172) –¬†Benjamin Zander:The transformative power of classical music¬†(171) –¬†Adam Grant:¬†The surprising habits of original thinkers¬†(170) –¬†Harald Haas:¬†Forget Wi-Fi. Meet the new Li-Fi Internet¬†(169) –Tim Urban:¬†Inside the mind of a master procrastinator¬†(168) –¬†Vijay Kuma:The future of flying robots¬†(167) –¬†Robert Waldinger:¬†What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness¬†(166) –¬†Celeste Headlee:¬†10 ways to have an better conversation¬†(165) –¬†Mihaly Czikszentmihalyi:¬†Flow, the secret to happiness¬†(164) –¬†Jon Ronson:¬†When online shaming spirals out of control¬†(163) –¬†Simon Sinek:¬†Why good leaders make you feel safe¬†(162) –¬†Alex Faaborg:¬†Designing for virtual reality and the impact on education¬†(161) –¬†Dan Ariely:¬†How equal do we want the world to be? You’d be surprised¬†(160) –¬†Barry Schwartz:¬†The way we think about work is broken¬†(159) –¬†Becky Blanton:¬†The year I was homeless¬†(158) –¬†¬†Alessandro Acquisti:¬†What will a future without secrets look like?¬†(157) –¬†¬†Ben Wellington:¬†How we found the worst place to park in New York City – using big data¬†(156) –¬†Andreas Ekstr√∂m:¬†The moral bias behind your search results¬†(155) –¬†Maajid Nawaz.:¬†A global culture to fight the extremism¬†(154) – ¬†Nina Paley:¬†Copyright is brain damage¬†(153) –¬†¬†Zarayda Groenhart:¬†The story chooses you¬†(152) –¬†Zeynep Tufekci:¬†Online social change: easy to organize, hard to win¬†(151) –¬†Arthur Benjamin: The magic of Fibonacci numbers¬†(150) –¬†¬†Linda Hill: How to manage for collective creativity¬†(149) –¬†Sakena Yacoobi:¬†How I stopped the Taliban from shutting down my school¬†(148) –¬†Isabel Allende:¬†How to live passionately-no matter your age¬†(147) –¬†Will Stephen:¬†How to sound smart in your TEDx talk¬†(146) –¬†Oliver Sacks:¬†What hallucination reveals about our minds¬†(145) –¬†Nigel Marsh:¬†¬†How to make work-life balance work¬†(144) –¬†Sophie Scott:¬†Why we laugh¬†(143) –¬†Margaret Gould Stewart: How giant websites design for you (and a billion others, too)¬†(142) –¬†Jack Andraka: A promising test for pancreatic cancer … from a teenager¬†(141) –¬†Linda Cliatt-Wayman: How to fix a broken school? Lead fearlessley, love hard¬†(140) –¬†Hannah Fry: The mathematics of love¬†(139) –¬†Jef Staes: The naked sheep¬†(138) –¬†Cosmin Mihaiu: Physical therapy is boring – play a game instead¬†(137) –¬†Nicholas Negronte: A 30-year history of the future¬†(136) –¬†Derek Muller: The key to effective educational science videos¬†(135) –¬†Jan de Lange: Curious minds, serious play¬†(134) –¬†Claire Boonstra: The educational (r)evolution. Ask the “why” question¬†(133) –¬†Joseph DeSimone: Wat if 3D printing was 100x faster?¬†(132) –¬†Monica Lewinsky: The price of shame¬†(131) –¬†Sherry Turkle: Connected, but alone?¬†(130) –¬†Adora Svitak: What adults can learn from kids¬†(129) –¬†Zak Ebrahim: I¬†am the son of a terrorist. Here’s how I chose peace¬†(128) –¬†Miquel Nicolelis:¬†Brain-to-brain communication has arrived. How we did it¬†(127) –Sajan George: The future of education¬†(126) –¬†Stuart Brown: Play is more than just fun¬†(125) –¬†Christopher Emdin: Teach teachers how to create magic¬†(124) –¬†Peter Doolittle: How your “working memory” makes sense of the world¬†(123) –¬†David Grady: How to save the world (or at least yourself) from bad meetings¬†(122) –¬†Deborah Gordon: What ants teach us about the brain, cancer and the internet¬†(121) –¬†Louie Schwartzberg: Gratitude¬†(120) –¬†Hans and Ola Rosling: How not to be ignorant about the world¬†(119) –¬†Adele Diamond: Turning some ideas on their head¬†(118) –¬†Annemarie Steen:¬†What happens when you press PLAY(117) –¬†Jeff Lliff: One more reason to get a good night’s sleep¬†(116) –¬†Midas Kwant: Finding your passion¬†(115) –¬†Glenn Greenwald: Why privacy matters¬†(114) –¬†Kadir van Lohuizen:¬†Contemporay migration in the Americas¬†(113) –¬†Uri Alon: Why truly innovative science demands a leap into the unknow¬†(112) –¬†Edward Deci:¬†Promoting motivation, health, and excellence¬†(111) –¬†David Kwong: Two nerdy obsessions meet – and it’s magic¬†(110) –¬†Stefan Larsson: What doctors can learn frm each other¬†(109) –¬†Jill Shargaa: Please, please, pleople. Let’s put the ‘awe’ back in ‘awesome’¬†(108) –¬†AJ Jacobs: The world’s largest family reunion … we’re all invited¬†(107) –¬†Frans Timmermans: Be like Jack Sparrow; embrace your fears¬†(106) –¬†Sue Austin: Deep sea diving in a wheelchair¬†(105) –¬†Stella Young: I’m nor your inspiration, thank you very much¬†(104) –¬†Ray Kurzweil: Get ready for hybrid thinking¬†(103) –¬†David Eggers: My wish: Once upon a school¬†(102) –¬†Philip Evans: How data will transform business¬†(101) –¬†Malcolm Gladwell: Choice, happiness and spaghetti sauce¬†(100) –¬†Mark Ronson: How sampling transformed music¬†(99) –¬†Shimon Schocken: The self-organizing computer course¬†(98) –¬†Edward Snowden: Here’s how we take back the internet¬†(97) –¬†Hugh Herr: The new bionics that let us run, climb and dance¬†(96) –¬†Ed Yong: Zombie roaches and other parasite tales¬†(95) –¬†Maysoon Zayid: I got 99 problems … palsy is just one¬†(94) –¬†Nicholas Negroponte: 5 predictions from 1984¬†(93) –¬†Richard Culatta: Reimagining learning¬†(92) –¬†Richard Baraniuk: The birth of the open source learning revolution¬†(91) –¬†Anant Agarwall: Why massive open online courses (still) matter¬†(90) –¬†Adam Savage: How simple ideas lead to scientific discoveries¬†(89) –¬†Onora O’Neill: What we don’t understand about trust¬†(88) –¬†Kate Hartman: The art of wearable communication¬†(87) –¬†Willem Jan Renger: Games as design language for teaching and learning¬†(86) –¬†Alastair Parvin: Architecture for the people by the people¬†(85) –¬†Claire Boonstra: The shift to value-centered education¬†(84) –¬†Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are¬†(83) –¬†Jill Bolte Taylor: My stroke of insight¬†(82) –¬†Sebastian Thrun: Google’s driverless carr¬†(81) –¬†Amy Webb: How I hacked online dating¬†(80) –¬†John Searle: Our shared condition – consciousness¬†(79) –¬†Erik Martin: How World of Warcraft saved me and my education¬†(78) –¬†Margaret Heffernan: Dare to disagree¬†(77) –¬†Ken Jennings: Watson, Jeopardy and me, the obsolete know-it-all¬†(76) –¬†Kelly McGonigal: How to make stress your friend¬†(75) –¬†Dan Meyer: Doing the impossible, swallowing the sword, cutting through fear¬†(74) –¬†Ramsey Musallam: 3 rules to spark learning¬†(73) –¬†Rita Pierson: Every kid needs a champion¬†(72) –¬†ShaoLan: Learn to read Chinese … with ease!¬†(71) –¬†Salman Khan: Let’s use video to reinvent education¬†(70) –¬†Itay Talgam: Lead like the great conductors¬†(69) –¬†Juan Enriquez: Your online life, permanent as a tattoo¬†(68) –¬†David Pogue: 10 top time-saving tech tips¬†(67) –¬†Ken Robinson: How to escape education’s death valley¬†(66) –¬†Tyler DeWitt: Hey Science teachers – make it fun¬†(65) –¬†Dan Ariely: What makes us feel good about work¬†(64) –¬†Jan Bommerez: The promise of co-intelligence¬†(63) –¬†Eric Whitacre: A virtual choir 2.000 voices strong¬†(62) –¬†Marjolein Caniels: How to unlock creative potentional at the workplace¬†(61) –¬†Sugata Mitra: Build a school in the cloud¬†(60) –¬†Amanda Palmer: The art of asking¬†(58) –¬†Tony Buzan: The power of a mind to map¬†(57) –¬†Matthew Peterson: Teaching without words¬†(56) –¬†Steven Johnson: Where good ideas come from¬†(55) –¬†Susan Cain: The power of introverts¬†(54) –¬†Andy Puddicombe: All is takes is 10 minutes mindful¬†(53) –¬†Peter Norvig: The 1000.000 student classroom¬†(52) –¬†Dan Pink:The puzzle of motivation¬†(51) –¬†Hans Rosling: New insights on poverty¬†(50) –¬†Nice Nailantei Leng’ete: Changing Traditions¬†(49)


Smart simplicity #TEDtalk

Je bent het nieuwe jaar goed bloggend begonnen, Marcel! Denk niet in goede voornemens maar in dagelijkse rituelen, las ik gisteren in De Correspondent. Mooi ritueel ūüėČ
Laat ik dan ook maar eens mijn eerste blogje van 2018 posten. Deze TEDtalk heb ik gisteren via-via toevallig gezien (serendipity rules ūüôā ). Ik vond ‘m de moeite waard om op te nemen in onze TED JAMs.

Yves Morieux is gespecialiseerd in sociale wetenschappen in organisaties en zegt dat het tijd is is voor een paradigmaverschuiving. De traditionele pijlers van het management zijn verouderd. Het is tijd voor versimpeling van organisatiestructuren.

De huidige manier van organiseren rust op twee pijlers:

  1. De harde pijler : structuur, processen, systemen.
  2. De zachte pijker : gevoelens, relaties, karakters, persoonlijkheid.

Alle managementtheorie√ęn zijn gebaseerd op 1 van deze pijlers, of op een combinatie. Veranderingen gebaseerd op √©√©n of beide pijlers maakt dat de organisatie complexer wordt. Meer regels en procedures, ingewikkelde structuren. Door de toenemende complexiteit voelen steeds meer werknemers minder betrokken bij hun werk.

Antwoord op de toenemende complexiteit moet niet langer gezocht worden in het bouwen van n√≥g complexere organisaties, luidt zijn betoog. De complexiteit bu√≠ten de organisatie vraagt juist om simpelheid b√≠nnen de organisatie.¬†In zijn TEDtalk legt Morieux zes regels uit voor ‘slimme eenvoud’. Samenwerking is hierin het centrale begrip.

    1. Begrijp wat je collega’s doen.Wat doen ze echt?
    2. Zorg ervoor dat managers zoveel mogelijk verbindingen leggen zodat meer samenwerking ontstaat.
    3. Geef medewerkers meer macht en bevoegdheden die ze nodig hebben (zet ze in hun kracht).
    4. Maak feedbackcirkels, zodat mensen de gevolgen zien van hun handelen.
    5. Verhoog de wederkerigheid door schotten tussen diensten, afdelingen en mensen weg te halen. Je hebt elkaar nodig om samen te werken.
    6. Beloon wie samenwerkt en bestraf hen die dat niet doet. Dwing mensen open kaart te spelen en dat ze tijdig hulp van collega’s vragen.
      “It changes everything. Suddenly it becomes in my interest to be transparent on my real weaknesses, my real forecast, because I know I will not be blamed if I fail,but if I fail to help or ask for help.”


Simpel toch?


The problem of knowledge polarization #TEDtalk #mustsee

Morgen in de Nieuwsflits maar nu al op ons blog! Deze geweldige TEDtalk van de filosoof Michael Patrick Lynch: How to see past your own perspective and find truth.

Lynch stelt ons een soort Matrix-samenleving voor. Wat als je een chip in je hersenen hebt waarmee het hele internet onderdeel is van je geheugen? Als je zo snel toegang hebt tot informatie wil dat nog niet zeggen dat die betrouwbaarder is, of dat we deze op dezelfde manier interpreteren. We dragen nu al een wereld aan informatie in onze zakken, maar het lijkt er op, zegt Lynch, dat hoe meer informatie we delen hoe moeilijker het wordt het onderscheid te maken tussen wat echt is en wat fake-nieuws is.

To solve the problem of knowledge polarization, we’re going to need to reconnect with one fundamental, philosophical idea: that we live in a common reality.

Daarvoor moeten we 3 dingen doen, volgens Michael Patrick Lynch:

  1. believe in truth
  2. dare to know
  3. a little humility

We moeten ons realiseren dat we allemaal onze eigen perspectief op de realiteit hebben. En die realiteit wordt ook heel erg be√Įnvloed door de filterbubbels waar we in zitten.

Knowing that you don’t know it all


Mooiee avond.


Jane McGonigal @TEDxSkoll : The future is dark (and that is a good thing)

Hi Marcel,

Uiteraard heb jij deze nieuwe TEDtalk van Jane McGonigal al gezien. En het is weer een juweeltje. Ook deze hoort natuurlijk¬†via ons blog gedeeld te worden. Ik wil er niet te veel over vertellen. Jane moet je horen en zien ūüôā

Als¬†director¬†of Games Research & Development van het¬†Institute for the Future¬†spreekt ze dit keer tijdens TEDxSkoll¬†over technieken om je mind los te maken¬†zodat je open staat voor mogelijke veranderingen in je leven, werk, samenleving.¬†Eigenlijk wil niemand weten hoe de toekomst er uit ziet. Je wilt er over dromen. Door de toekomst te verbeelden helpt dat deze te realiseren. Zij noemt deze technieken The triangle of “What if ….”

  • predicting the past
  • remembering the future
  • hard empathy

The gift of the future is creativity!

To create something new, or make a change, you have to be able to imagine how things can be different. The future is a place where everything can be different.
Jane McGonigal

Enjoy watching again.

This virtual lab wil revolutionize science class #TEDtalk

Zoals je weet, Marcel, stel ik op maandag de Nieuwsflits samen. Omdat hierin ook elke week een TEDtalk is opgenomen, kijk ik op maandag vaak een TEDtalk. Vandaag ook. Zojuist een mooie gezien die morgen in Nieuwsflits komt, maar ook goed past in ons blog.

Michael Bodekaer demonstreert in zijn TEDtalk Labster, een virtueel laboratorium waarin studenten virtuele experimenten kunnen uitvoeren.

In zijn TEDtalk laat zijn zien dat door het toevoegen van virtual reality je zelfs kunt simuleren dat je in het laboratorium bent ipv experimenteren achter een computerscherm. Volgens Michael Bodekaer is virtual reality een nieuwe lesmethode waarmee de kwaliteit van het (wetenschappelijk) onderwijs verbeterd kan worden. Nou, daar ben ik het wel mee eens. En jij?


Four principles for the open world. TEDtalk Don Tapscott

Gisteren een TEDtalk van Don Tapscott en ja, vandaag weer √©√©n, Marcel. Deze is te mooi en past te veel in mijn straatje om ‘m niet te delen op ons blog. Deze TEDtalk van Tapscott¬†Four principles for the open world¬†is al wat ouder (2012) maar nog steeds actueel.

Het verhaal is bekend maar de betekenissen¬†(samenwerking, transparantie, delen, emancipatie) die hij benoemd bij de term ‘openheid’ zijn nog geen gemeengoed, tenminste zo ervaar ik dat niet. Het kan zo mooi zijn: internet waarmee¬†het tijdperk van ‘genetwerkte intelligentie’ wordt waargemaakt.

You need to have integrity as part of your bones and your DNA as an organization, because if you don’t, you’ll be unable to build trust, and trust is a sine qua non of this new network world.

En hij maakt er zo’n hoopvol verhaal van, met een heel mooi en voor mij al bekend filmpje tot slot.

And imagine, just consider this idea, if you would: What if we could connect ourselves in this world through a vast network of air and glass? Could we go beyond just sharing information and knowledge? Could we start to share our intelligence? Could we create some kind of collective intelligence that goes beyond an individual or a group or a team to create, perhaps, some kind of consciousness on a global basis? Well, if we could do this, we could attack some big problems in the world.

Must see!

Mooi weekend

How the blockchain is changing money and business. TEDtalk Don Tapscott

Hi Marcel,

We hebben op ons blog al een paar geschreven over Blockchain (de onderliggende technologie van Bitcoin) en de mogelijkheden voor het onderwijs (edublocks). Op zoek naar een TEDtalk voor de Nieuwsflits kwam ik deze tegen van  Don Tapscott, een Canadees die veel publiceert en spreekt over de invloed van informatietechnologie op samenleving en ondernemingen (bekend van Wikinomics).

Samen met zijn zoon heeft hij onlangs het boek Blockchain Revolution: How the Technology Behind Bitcoin is Changing Money, Business, and the World geschreven. In deze TED-talk geeft Don Tapscott een mooie samenvatting van de principes van blockchain en de mogelijke impact hiervan op mens en samenleving.


21052017 toegevoegd
Tapscott, D., & and Tapscott, A, (2017). The blockchain revolution and higher education. Educause Review 


TEDxSittardGeleen op 23 september!

Hi Marcel,

Was jij ook zo verrast door het bericht over de komst van TEDx-conferentie naar Sittard-Geleen. Niet zo zeer over de komst an sich. Na onze bezoeken aan TEDxRoermond en TEDxMaastricht en mijn deelname aan TEDxEutropolis in Aken en Heerlen lag een TEDx-event in Sittard-Geleen in de lijn der verwachting. Ik vond het wel verrassend om te lezen dat Zuyd als founding partner betrokken is.



Na onze mislukte pogingen van 4 jaar geleden een TEDxZuyd van de grond te krijgen: jouw droom (Welterusten en droom lekker! Met je TED naar bed!) en onze initiatieven de Zuyd-community er bij te betrekken (TEDxZuyd … een stapje dichter bij onze droom?), de gesprekken die we hierover binnen en buiten Zuyd hebben gevoerd, na de kennisdeelsessie tijdens KiB2012 en na bijna 125 TEDtalks in de Nieuwsflits van de afgelopen jaren is Zuyd betrokken de organisatie van een TEDx!

Op de Facebookpagina van TEDxSittardGeleen las ik dat collega Rob van Loevezijn die met studenten de eerste 3D auto heeft geprint, gaat presenteren op het TEDx-podium. Stoer! En vernam ik dat voorafgaand aan het event dat plaatsvindt op 23 september (blok je agenda!) pitches worden opgezet waaruit ook nog enkele sprekers worden georganiseerd. Op 12 juni de eerste op de Chemelot Campus. En ook Zuyd organiseert nog een pitch event voor al haar studenten. Geweldig!

Ik had er binnen Zuyd nog niets over gehoord of gelezen. Jij wel? Benieuwd hoe de kaartjes voor dit event verdeeld worden. Ik¬†hoop alleen dat Zuyd als founding partner haar dromers van het eerste uur niet vergeet ūüôā ¬†(En ik las¬†vanmorgen dat je ook je mislukkingen moet publiceren, ook anderen kunnen soms een ‘offday’¬†hebben *grijns* )


Als je ogen maar twinkelen

Hallo Marcel,

Vandaag heb ik een TEDtalk bekeken die tijdens ons TEDtalk-event op KiB 2012 ook getoond is. Aanleiding was de NRC-column van Ben Tiggelaar die schreef over de masterclass van de 77-jarige topdirigent en leiderschapscoach Ben Zander. Zanders boodschap aan managers en leiders die hij keer op keer herhaald, is:

Now, I had an amazing experience. I was 45 years old, I’d been conducting for 20 years, and I suddenly had a realization. The conductor of an orchestra doesn’t make a sound. But the conductor doesn’t make a sound. He depends, for his power, on his ability to make other people powerful. And that changed everything for me. It was totally life-changing. People in my orchestra said,“Ben, what happened?” That’s what happened. I realized my job was to awaken possibility in other people. And of course, I wanted to know whether I was doing that. How do you find out? You look at their eyes. If their eyes are shining, you know you’re doing it.¬†

Zolang leidinggevenden niet op die twinkeling in onze ogen letten, luisteren we naar de andere boodschap die Zanders vaak tegen zijn studenten zegt:

Je moet voorbij de fuck it-grens gaan. Je moet je passie en energie laten zien.

Een wijs man ūüôā

%d bloggers liken dit: